Posts Tagged With: John Wesley

The Sacrament of Holy Communion

lords_supper

This week at Flint Hill UMC we will be celebrating the sacrament of Holy Communion and I wanted to share what we as United Methodist believe regarding this Holy Sacrament.

The sacraments of Baptism and Holy Communion are crucial means of grace, or vehicles, that God uses to reach humanity.  They are channels by which the grace and love of God flows, and it is through them that we can receive prevenient, justifying, and sanctifying grace.  They are outward and visible signs of an inward, invisible grace.

The sacrament of Holy Communion confirms the justification of our sins through the action of Christ.  It also refreshes and strengthens our souls as Wesley described in “The Duty of Constant Communion.”  The Christian life is not an easy journey, and there are temptations and stumbling blocks along the way.  As with our physical life, which requires proper nutritional sustenance in order to grow, our spiritual life also requires sustenance, which is found in the bread and wine of Holy Communion.  We obtain our strength from this sacrament, and it is the “food of our soul.”  Holy Communion is a remembrance, a commemoration, and a memorial, but it is more than just a simple intellectual recalling.  It is a representation of past gracious acts of God in an action that makes them present today.  Jesus Christ is risen from the grave and alive in the here and now.

Several summers ago, my wife and I directed a Senior High Camp at Sumatanga.  One night during the week, Holy Communion was included in the worship service, and I witnessed the power and significance of the sacrament in a wonderful way. A young man, who was a junior in high school,  had become a very popular youth in the camp and was a guy whom everyone just seemed to like and looked up to.  During the Communion portion of the service, everyone was invited to stay at the altar and pray as long as needed.  I noticed that young man was staying for an extended time, and then I noticed his shoulders quivering from crying.  I went over and asked him if I could pray with him, and he just grabbed hold of my hands.  Without my saying a word, he started telling me that he was not worthy of what Christ had done for him and that he was not living the life that God was calling him to live.  Through tears we prayed together.  He asked God for forgiveness and the strength to live the life that God had called him to live.  Through the sacrament of Communion, God reached out to Frank (Not his real name) and confirmed the justification of sin through Christ and conveyed a grace that went straight to the heart of this young man.

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Stewardship According to John Wesley

An outline of John Wesley‘s Sermon on Stewardship:

The Good Steward”

Summary:  Wesley uses this sermon to explain that we as God’s Stewards are not the owners of what God entrust to us, but temporary custodians.  This applies to our souls, bodies, possessions, time, abilities and opportunities.  Wesley states in this sermon that there will be a day of great judgment when a final accountability will be given for our stewardship.

Introduction:

  1. The Bible describes the created as debtors and servants to the creator.
  2. The best description is that of a steward or manager.
  1. The Nature of Stewardship
  2. The Duration of Our Stewardship
  3. The Final Accounting of Our Stewardship
    1. The Value of Time
    2. How precious is every moment in time.
    3. In using time, no word or deed is truly unimportant.
    4. There are no works that produce excess merit.  We cannot do too much.
    5. It is not easy to give back to God all that he has given us, it will require all our wisdom, perseverance, patience, and faithfulness.
  1. Debtors are obligated to return what they have received, but can use it however they wish until the return.  This is not the case with stewards.
    1. We are obligated to use our blessings as God wishes not ourselves.
    2. Nothing is our own in this world.
  2. God has entrusted us with all that we have received including our minds and souls
  3. In doing God’s will we obtain our own happiness; therefore we should use our blessings for his glory.
  4. God entrust us with our bodies
  5. God has given us the superior capacity for speech and it is to be used to glorify
  6. God has given us our hands and feet and bodies.
  7. God has given us worldly goods of food, clothing, shelter and money.
  8. God has given us the gift of energy, health, favorable appearance, education, knowledge and influence.
    1. The gift of time and the grace of God and the power of the Holy Spirit
  1. We are only stewards for a short time while on earth.
  2. After we die, we won’t need the things God has entrusted to us.
  3. The same applies to the body.
  4. Death ends the need for speech, strength, health and beauty.
  5. What about the other talents such as the “still, small voice”?
  6. Our physical faculties will not probably exist after death, but continue in a greater degree.
  7. We don’t know how much wisdom will remain after death.
  8. Our souls will remain and retain all their faculties.
  9. Our comprehension will be freed from its present defects.
  10.  Some might say that disembodied spirits have no senses but they are dreaming.
  11. The soul will retain its comprehension and the full vigor of its will and affections. 
  12. However we are no longer stewards of these faculties.
  1. After death, we are no longer stewards and must give an accounting.
    1. We don’t know if it is immediate at the time of death.
  2. We are to give the account of our stewardship when “the great white throne and the one who sat on it come down from heave, and the earth and the heaven flee from God’s presence, and no place is found for them.”
  3. God will ask, “How did you use your life?
  4. God will ask, “How did you use your body?”
  5. God will ask, “How did you use your worldly goods?”
  6. God will ask, “Have you been a wise and faithful stewards of all the gifts?”
    1. If so, God will declare, “Well done, good and trustworthy servant; enter into my Kingdom.”
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The Danger of Riches

“The Danger of Riches”

1 Timothy 6:9

SummaryAs the population of the Methodist grew, the found themselves with more members who were wealthy.  Wesley used this sermon to speak on the dangers of wealth and how it could be inlet to sin.  He describes how people should gain as much as they can, save as much as they can and give as much as they can.  Wesley’s belief was to only accumulate what you need and give the rest away.

Introduction:

  1. Many don’t know about the warning in 1 Timothy 6:9
  2. It is not speaking of gaining riches unjustly, but just of being rich.
  3. There are not a whole lot of people preaching this.
  4. May God give me right and forcible words?
    1. To explain the Apostles words
    2. To apply them
  1. To explain the Apostles words.
    1. Provide what is necessary for our family.
    2.  Save up enough to carry on business.
    3.  Enough to leave our children to supply them with necessary
    4.  Pay off our debts.
    5. Applying what has been said
  1. What is it to be rich
    1. Having food and coverings plus more
    2. Riches are above the plain necessaries or conveniences of life.
  2. This also implies those that desire to be rich.
  3. Includes all those that set a purpose of endeavor to get more.
  4. It includes those who lay up treasures on earth.
    1. We are allowed to:
    2. Provide what is necessary for our family
    3. Save up enough to carry on business
    4. Enough to leave our children to supply them with necessary.
    5. Pay off our debts.
  1. This includes all who posses more than they use.  God only lends this to us.  God entrust us to be stewards.
  2. It is for those who find delight in money and seek their happiness in money.
  3. There is a covetousness of money in which people have a desire to have more.
  4. We have a hard time with this and only through God can we understand this and do it.
  5. Those who are rich fall into temptation.
  6. They fall into a snare of the devil that he set.
  7. The fall into hurtful desires
  8. They desire happiness out of God.  They love the creature more than God.
  9. The desire of the flesh has developed a “taste” for the world that is not harmful to the body but to the soul.
  10. The desire of the eyes is the desiring and seeking happiness in gratifying the imagination.
  11. Seeking happiness in learning and not in God.
  12. Seeking to be honored, yearning for the applause.
  13. The desire of having it easy and avoiding trouble, danger, difficulty and a desire of sleeping through life.
  14. Riches lead to foolish and hurtful desires and when one has the means to satisfy, these desires will increase.
  15. As they grow, the desires will cause many sorrows of remorse and end up drowning the body in pain, disease, ‘destruction’, and the soul in everlasting perdition.
  1. How do we put this into practice?
  2. Stop!  Evil is before you and you are running toward the sharp edge of a sword.
  3. Are you endeavoring to be rich?
  4. Are you laying up for yourselves treasures on this earth?
  5. You can gain all you can and save all you can without storing up on earth.
  6. Gain all you can, save all you can without wasting; yet by giving all I can I am protected against laying up treasures on earth.
  7. It’s not the quantity of what we possess, it is how we employ according to the will of our Lord.
  8. Don’t throw the excess away; give it to all men and to the poor.
  9. Your wealth will be a witness against you and destroy you as if it were fire.  Start today!
  10. Money is not going to make you happy, look at those who are already rich.
  11. If you are desiring to be rich, WHY?  It leads to a pit and temptation.
  12. Have these desires not hurt you enough?
  13. Have they not cooled your love of God?
  14. If you get richer, it will destroy your humility. People will think you are better than you are and you will believe them.
  15. The richer you are the means are available to seek revenge and thus goes the meekness.
  16. Your patience is also lost.
  17. You will no longer rejoice to ‘endure hardship’ nor rush to into the Kingdom of Heaven.
  18. You will lose the zeal for works of mercy and piety.
  19. You lose your compassion for the ignorant.
  20. You have heard the warning.
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John Wesley’s View on Money

As we begin our sermon series on the use of money, I thought it would be appropriate to give you an outline on John Wesley‘s view of money.  This sermon can be broken down to 3 points: Gain All You Can, Save All You Can, and Give All You Can.

“The Use of Money”

SummaryWesley uses this sermon to outline the proper use of earning, possessions and wealth with a very articulate statement: “Gain all you can, save all you can, give all you can.”  He uses this as an opportunity to insist that we are not owners of our assets, but stewards.

Introduction:

  1. There will be an accounting of our management of resources.
  2. Money can be bad, but it can also be good.  It can become the eyes to the blind and feet to the lame.
  3. It is one of our highest concerns to know how to use this valuable gift.
  1. Gain all You Can.
  2. Save All You Can
  3. Give All You Can.
  1. Without paying more than its worth; or at the expense of life or health
  2. Without harming our minds
    1. Lying, cheating, practices that are not in good consciences.
  3.  We must never harm others.
  4. Not gain more by harming our neighbor’s bodies.
  5. There are unscrupulous medicine “professionals” and it is clear that they are doing to others what they do not want done in return.
  6. These ways of gaining money comes at a high price.
  7. Cautions and restrictions
    1. Gain all you can by honest industry and diligence
    2. Make the most of your time
    3. Work with all your might.
    4. Do your work as well as possible and in a timely manner.
  8. Use common sense.
  1. Don’t throw your precious gains into the sea
  2. Don’t waste it on desires of the flesh.
  3. Don’t waste on desires of the eye such as fine clothing, houses, paintings, decorations gardens.
  4. Don’t spend to gain the admiration or praise of others.
  5. When we cater to these desires, they only increase.
  6. Don’t buy your kids everything and the best of everything.
  7. Don’t leave the kids money to squander.  Don’t set traps.
  8. Leave your money to the child that knows the value of money.
  1. Don’t stop with gaining and saving all you can.  You must give all you can.
  2. The sole ownership of everything rest with God.
  3. Provide for your basic needs; provide for your family; give the rest to the needy.
  4. How should you spend upon yourself?
    1. Am I acting according to my character?
    2. Am I giving this money in obedience to God’s word?
    3. Can I offer up this action as a sacrifice to God?
    4. Do I believe that I will receive a reward for this work at the resurrection?
  5. If your conscience says that this pleases God then you have no doubt that it is right and good.
  6. In your living and dying, waste nothing on sin or foolishness for yourself or your children.
  7. We cannot be wise or faithful stewards without managing the Lord’s goods in this way.
    1. Lead a life worthy of the dignity of your calling.
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What Is It? The Wesley Quadrilateral…

English:

Image via Wikipedia

The Wesley quadrilateral is a method of exploring and understanding God. John Wesley adopted and adapted three of these position from the Church of England (Scripture, Reason, and Tradition), and he added Experience to form the quadrilateral.

Scripture

John Wesley believed as I do, that Scripture must be primary among the other sources.  Wesley believed that the Scriptures were the infallible word of God, and to him this meant that the Bible will not fail in life, faith, and practice.  I believe that Scripture provides all things necessary that one is to know for salvation, and that it is the primary source and authority for our faith.  Nothing can override the primacy of God that is revealed in Scriptures, thus the Bible is used to judge all other positions.

While Wesley believed in the infalliblilty of Scriptures, that does not mean that we as United Methodist believe in the inerrancy of the Bible.  As one is reading Scriptures, he/she must keep in mind that the writers were influenced by their culture and traditions.  As we read Scripture, we must look beyond the cultural differences and allow the Holy Spirit to guide us in the discernment of what God is communicating to us. We must also be careful not to isolate passages but to base our doctrine and beliefs on Scripture as a whole.  Taking individual passages out of context has led to doctrines such as predestination and women being subservient to men.  Throughout Scripture it is found that God’s grace is available to all and not just a select few.

Tradition

Tradition is those beliefs, practices, and customs that the Church has passed down over the centuries.  We don’t have to “re-invent the wheel” of Christianity.  Tradition affirms and places value in past works through which God’s work and action is seen.   It is through the traditions that we have the hymns, creeds, and liturgy that add to the value of our faith.

I found through my experiences with contemporary worship that people who have not been to church in years oftentimes will feel a strong attachment to an old hymn.  It might connect them to their childhood, a memory, or some sort of familiarity they have with God.  We may sing it in a different way or use different instruments, but the words and meaning transcend the ages and continue to minister.

Tradition is and should be held in high regard by the Church, but it should never contradict or supercede Scripture.  It also should never hold us back from growing closer to God.  I once heard the seven deadliest words to a church are, “We’ve never done it that way before.”  Yet, these words are implied/said when using a different type of musical instrument is rejected.  Those words are said when new ways of reaching people are discarded because “it’s never been done that way.” God uses people each and every day, and God will use people in the future to create new traditions that will continue sharing the love and grace of Jesus Christ with the world.

Reason

Reason is the means by which Scripture and Tradition can be examined and understood by a thoughtful person.   It is through reason that we ask good questions and seek to gain the understanding of God’s will for our lives.  My United Methodist Theology and Doctrine professor in seminary described reason in this way: “God gave you a brain and wants you to use it.  It is through reason that we can study and interpret the Scriptures, we can ask and search for answers to questions of faith, and we can discern where God is calling us.”

Experience

John Wesley added Experience to the Anglican trilogy of Scripture, Tradition, and Reason.  The experiences we have in our everyday lives interact with our reading of Scripture.  We read Scripture through the lens of our own personal life experiences.  If one is in the midst of a struggle or oppression, he/she will read the Scripture through the lens of someone in need of freedom and release.  I have seen this through a woman who was living in an abusive marital situation.  She would cling to the hope of freedom found in her Bible about how God delivers His people from oppression.  Her life experiences played a large role in her reading of Scripture and understanding of God.  Our personal experiences allow us to find and apply Scriptural truths in our real-life situations.

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The Sacrament of Holy Communion

The sacraments of Baptism and Holy Communion are crucial means of grace, or vehicles, that God uses to reach humanity.  They are channels by which the grace and love of God flows, and it is through them that we can receive prevenient, justifying, and sanctifying grace.  They are outward and visible signs of an inward, invisible grace.

The sacrament of Holy Communion confirms the justification of our sins through the action of Christ.  It also refreshes and strengthens our souls as Wesley described in “The Duty of Constant Communion.”  The Christian life is not an easy journey, and there are temptations and stumbling blocks along the way.  As with our physical life, which requires proper nutritional sustenance in order to grow, our spiritual life also requires sustenance, which is found in the bread and wine of Holy Communion.  We obtain our strength from this sacrament, and it is the “food of our soul.”  Holy Communion is a remembrance, a commemoration, and a memorial, but it is more than just a simple intellectual recalling.  It is a representation of past gracious acts of God in an action that makes them present today.  Jesus Christ is risen from the grave and alive in the here and now.

Last summer my wife and I directed a Senior High Camp at Sumatanga.  One night during the week, Holy Communion was included in the worship service, and I witnessed the power and significance of the sacrament in a wonderful way. A young man, who was a junior in high school,  had become a very popular youth in the camp and was a guy whom everyone just seemed to like and looked up to.  During the Communion portion of the service, everyone was invited to stay at the altar and pray as long as needed.  I noticed that young man was staying for an extended time, and then I noticed his shoulders quivering from crying.  I went over and asked him if I could pray with him, and he just grabbed hold of my hands.  Without my saying a word, he started telling me that he was not worthy of what Christ had done for him and that he was not living the life that God was calling him to live.  Through tears we prayed together.  He asked God for forgiveness and the strength to live the life that God had called him to live.  Through the sacrament of Communion, God reached out to Frank (Not his real name) and confirmed the justification of sin through Christ and conveyed a grace that went straight to the heart of this young man.

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Communion by Rev Ted Leach

For me, communion is a way of receiving God’s undeserved love, which we sometimes call grace.  I cup my hands to receive the bread as a gesture of receptiveness.  The bread and the cup are reminders of Jesus’ last supper with his disciples, which was a celebration of the Passover meal on the night that he was arrested.  The last supper was in close proximity to the death and resurrection of Jesus.  So, receiving communion draws me closer to the cross, which for me symbolizes God’s love for me and for all creation.  The bread represents the body of Christ, which also connects me to all who trust in Jesus as savior, the church, the Body of Christ in the world. The bread’s symbolic meaning didn’t begin with Jesus, but with the Passover meal’s unleavened bread, which reminds me of God’s saving action throughout history, including the Israelites’ deliverance from slavery in Egypt.  The cup reminds me of the blood of Christ, or more specifically, his death on the cross.  That, too, has its roots in the Passover meal, which included several cups of wine.  One was the cup of blessing.  Each sabbath, when Jews gather today, they still lift the cup of blessing.  Another cup at Passover was placed there for Elijah, whom Jews still expect to return before the Messiah comes.  Some people think when Jesus passed the cup among his disciples that he took Elijah’s cup.  If so, that may have been a way of saying, “You no long need to wait for the Messiah.”  Now that I’ve lived a significant number of years, each time I receive communion, it also reminds me of places I’ve received communion in the past and the people with whom I shared the bread and cup.  This includes countless worship services in churches, in gatherings of the Annual Conference, in clergy meetings, in the Holy Land, on mission trips to Latin America, at Donaldson Prison–including Death Row.  John Wesley called communion a means of grace, and I believe he was right.  We call it a sacrament, a holy act, like baptism.  We call it the Lord’s Supper, or Holy Communion, or the Eucharist (which is a Greek word for “Thanksgiving”).  Communion is all this, and as I grow older, I discover more and more of its power and meaning.

Blessings,
Ted

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Hold Yourself Accountable (Wesley Style)

Signature of John Wesley, founder of Methodism

Image via Wikipedia

I was doing some research today and I ran across these questions that are similar to the ones that John Wesley gave to the members of his discipleship groups. This was over 200 years ago and they are still good questions for Christians to ask themselves today.

I challenge you to make these questions a daily part of your spiritual journey.

  1. Am I consciously or unconsciously creating the impression that I am better than I really am? In other words, am I a hypocrite?
  2. Do I confidentially pass on to others what has been said to me in confidence?
  3. Can I be trusted?
  4. Am I a slave to dress, friends, work or habits?
  5. Am I self-conscious, self-pitying, or self-justifying?
  6. Did the Bible live in me today?
  7. Do I give the Bible time to speak to me every day?
  8. Am I enjoying prayer?
  9. When did I last speak to someone else of my faith?
  10. Do I pray about the money I spend?
  11. Do I get to bed on time and get up on time?
  12. Do I disobey God in anything?
  13. Do I insist upon doing something about which my conscience is uneasy?
  14. Am I defeated in any part of my life?
  15. Am I jealous, impure, critical, irritable, touchy or distrustful?
  16. How do I spend my spare time?
  17. Am I proud?
  18. Do I thank God that I am not as other people, especially as the Pharisees who despised the publican?
  19. Is there anyone whom I fear, dislike, disown, criticize, hold a resentment toward or disregard? If so, what am I doing about it?
  20. Do I grumble or complain constantly?
  21. Is Christ real to me?
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Devout and Holy Life

 

Rev John Hill and John Wesley at St. Pauls in London

 

The following is an article written by and used with permission from Ted Leach.  Enjoy, I did.

Somewhere along the way a simple idea became a doctrinal bone of contention.  There was a man named William Law (1686-1761) who wrote a book entitled A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life.  That book was formative for a slightly younger British cleric named John Wesley (1703-1791).  These two men were part of a movement that changed Great Britain for the better.  Their focus was simple:  as followers of Jesus Christ, seek to live a holy life.

John Wesley preached a fairly simple message, but it was a deep message that impacted the whole range of human existence.  Wesley believed every aspect of life was subject to the powerful scrutiny and the transforming grace of the Gospel.   His primary interest was in developing a sense of unity around the essence of Christianity and the core values of the church:  “If your heart is as my heart, then give me your hand.”   Wesley was thoroughly Protestant but he appreciated the faith of devout Roman Catholics.   He respected those who differed with him theologically, such as George Whitefield.  His deep commitment to the basics of Christianity and a strong (post-Aldersgate) sense of assurance gave him a self-confidence that enabled him to embrace people across a wide range of Christian experience and expression.   The Methodist movement became a rather large, inclusive tent.  Wesley encouraged people to “think and let think” regarding non-essential applications of the faith.

After John Wesley’s death, his spiritual descendants echoed his message while adding their own flavor.  Different and sometimes conflicting themes emerged in the Wesleyan community in the century after Wesley.  Doctrinal differences emerged around the definition of a holy life.  Some held to strict “dos” and “don’ts,” seeing outward behavior as the true measure of a holy life, while others were more accommodating to the changing values of the broader culture.   Some were more literal in their interpretation of scripture while others interpreted scripture in light of an emerging “historical criticism.”  Some preached a definitive “second work of grace,” a transformative event of the Holy Spirit that brings entire sanctification, while others focused on the gradual work of the Holy Spirit over one’s lifetime.  Wesley’s spiritual descendants began to populate various denominations in the holiness tradition such as the Church of the Nazarene and the Wesleyan Church.  Some joined the ranks of Pentecostal denominations such as the Church of God and the Assemblies of God.

These denominations, along with those that continued to use some form of the name “Methodist,” all share a common heritage:  to strive for holiness of heart and life.  Wesleyan people are future-focused and goal-oriented.   We believe God isn’t through with us yet.  Wesleyan people are “going on to perfection.”  We expect to “be made perfect in love in this life.”  United Methodists, Nazarenes, Pentecostals and Roman Catholics may express holiness of heart and life in different ways.  In the late 19th century and the 20th century, these groups often defined themselves apart from, or in contrast to, one another.   Perhaps in the 21st century, we will have more dialogue about the faith roots we share.

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Connect, Grow and Serve

It’s 12:28 Tuesday morning and I can’t sleep. The movers will be here at the crack of dawn, and I can’t sleep.  Jackson, the dogs and even the crickets have gone to bed and I can’t sleep.  I’ve tried, I’ve read, I’ve prayed, I’ve surfed the web, and counted sheep but I can’t sleep.  I’m too excited. It’s like being 9 years old and it’s Christmas eve.

The reason I can’t sleep and that I am so excited is because of the ministry opportunity at Union.  Wednesday afternoon, I will take over the pastoral duties there and I am pumped about it.  This evening as I try to get some sleep, the words CONNECT, GROW and SERVE keep going over and over in my mind.  This is the churches vision and how they approach their ministry.  Their vision is so in line with what I have always tried to do in my ministry and the importance of these words is incredible.

Connect:  There were some people one time who tried to trick Jesus (a very hard thing to do by the way). They asked him, “Teacher which is the most important commandment?” In the Jewish culture, there was over 600 of them.  He answered, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, mind and soul and there is a second “Love your neighbor as yourself.”  Wow! Here is Christ saying CONNECT with God and CONNECT with each other.  We cannot do one without the other.  We must connect but we must not limit our connectivity to within the walls of the church.  We must reach out into the community. There are so many hurting people who don’t know about the love and grace which is freely offered through Christ.  It’s our job to connect with them.

Union, The Church at Chelsea Park also realizes the importance of growth.  It’s really simple; you are either growing or you’re dead.  There is no sitting on the bench and watching others.  You must be in the game and being in the game means that you are growing spiritually.  It’s not like one accepts Christ and BOOM, that’s it.  It is just the beginning of a long process in which we strive each day to become like Jesus.  That was John Wesley’s desire for his followers and is called Sanctification.  It’s not an overnight thing but something we work on throughout our life.  I’m excited about growing to the next step in my own journey with the people at Union.

I have met many people who are at church every time the doors are open, they sit on the same pew and have been sitting there for years and yet there is something missing.  You don’t grow spiritually by attending church; you grow spiritually by being the church!

Out of all the people who have been born throughout history, there was only one who was born with the right to be served.  Jesus Christ. No one else has that birthright and yet he CHOSE to be a servant.  He chose to wash the nasty, dusty, stinky feet of his disciples.  So why would we as Christians think that we should be any different?

This weekend, Jill and I attended Asbury UMC in Madison with some friends and Rev Alan Weatherly said in his sermon that one of the things he doesn’t get is the closest parking place in the church parking lot reserved for the pastor.  I could not agree more.  If we are to become like Christ, we must GIVE UP the role of being served and TAKE ON the one of being servant.  It is only through that selfless, Christlike servanthood can we begin to glimpse what it truly means to be a Christian.

I’m so excited about being the pastor at Union.  Helping the people Connect with God and each other, being a part of their Growth to the next level in their spiritual journey, and serving with them as we build the Kingdom of God.

So, what do we do at Union?  WE CONNECT, GROW AND SERVE!

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